©2019 by Greg Nemet, PhD. 

RESEARCH

Meeting ambitious climate change targets such as the Paris Agreement will likely require removing gigatons of CO2 from the atmosphere each year.  In this project, we estimate the costs, removal potential, and pathways to scale up for a broad set of negative emissions technologies.

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This project is focused on understanding the fundamental relationships between learn-by-doing (LBD) knowledge spillovers in the solar industry and solar soft costs.  We explore the ways in which this understanding informs practical strategies to leverage knowledge spillovers to reduce future soft costs.

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POLICY CREDIBILITY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

Climate policy necessarily involves long term targets, which provide incentives for near term investment in low-carbon technology.  What if investors don't fully believe that those targets will be met?  This project looks at how policy can be designed to enhance long-term credibility.

BOOK: HOW SOLAR BECAME CHEAP

As a 2017 Andrew Carnegie Fellow, I have had the opportunity to dive deeply into thesequestions, drawing on new data sets, analyses, and interviewing over 60 individuals in more than a dozen countries.  The concept of National Innovation Systems provides a theoretical structure for this assessment and helps explain that PV’s success has been theresult of distinct contributions mainly by the US, Japan, Germany, and China—in that sequence. Flows of knowledge from one country to another—often embodied in equipment, and also as tacit knowledge in the heads of internationally mobile individuals—have been central to solar’s progress.