©2019 by Greg Nemet, PhD. 

TEACHING

I teach courses in energy systems analysis, policy analysis, and international environmental policy.  My teaching supports the curricula of two programs in the La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison:

Courses I teach regularly include:

INTRODUCTION TO ENERGY ANALYSIS AND POLICY (Public Affairs 809)

Heightened concern about both the availability of energy resources and their environmental impacts has increased demand for leaders and analysts who can navigate the political, economic, scientific, and technological dimensions of these issues to inform critical policy decisions. Few are able to do so; and those who can provide valuable insight. 

In this course, you will develop an understanding of the dynamics of the global energy system, focusing on ways that public policy can enact these changes in societally beneficial directions. The perspective taken is that of a policy maker confronting decisions about the design and implementation of energy policy.  Low carbon innovation is a key theme.

INTERNATIONAL POLICY ANALYSIS (Public Affairs 873) 

This course provides an introduction to the study of public policy and the professional practice of policy analysis with a focus on international policy issues. We consider a number of fundamental questions:

  • What are the rationales for collective interference in private affairs?

  • What are the limitations to collective action?

  • What are the generic instruments of public policy?

  • How can we measure social costs and benefits?

  • What are the appropriate roles for policy analysts in democratic societies?

The course seeks to improve basic skills in analytical thinking, information gathering, and writing as we attempt to answer these questions.  [Recent syllabus]

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE (Public Affairs 866) 

Students will become familiar with the breadth of environmental problems at stake and the history of attempts to solve them. After covering the basic frameworks, institutions and actors, the second half of the course will examine the details of policy design using case studies. We will spend four weeks studying a prominent contemporary international environmental issue, climate change. While no scientific background is needed for the class, each topic will include a review of the basic physical processes involved, taking the perspective that these characteristics affect the appropriateness of policy responses. [Recent syllabus]

SEMINAR IN ENERGY ANALYSIS AND POLICY (Environmental Studies 900) 

The faculty in the Energy Analysis and Policy program hold a 1-credit lunchtime seminar in the Fall semester.  Topic have included:

  • The use of models in energy analysis

  • Communicating energy analysis

  • Professional skills in energy analysis